Wednesday, August 01, 2007

Art, Style and Surfing


There are some hot conversations being batted around about the validity of "art boards" and "hipster shops" in the Oregon surf blogging world. Go HERE and HERE to jump in on the healthy debate. I think if you read my blog you know where I stand on the subject.

Coincidentally, I just found a really great article on Mollusk NYC's blog about John Belik, an arty dude whose creative spirit helped him push the boundries of surfboard design. Check it HERE.

Cat Power - Hate

9 comments:

Foulweather... said...

I don't understand this debate. The pimping of a 'surf lifestyle' is nothing new. Mollusk, Mandala and the like are unfair targets. On the contrary, they come across as very genuine and invested in the culture.

Bottomline, support local shapers, shops etc but if you want to attack the commodification or 'hipsterisation' of surfing there are better targets...

Nash said...

Interesting interview by jeff clark. Mentions Mandala.

http://www.newyorksurf.com/features/jeffclarkintv.html

Chum said...

I agree with supporting local shops/shapers. They've gotten more of my surf bucks than anybody else. I also think that if you find a shaper whose vision you're aligned with, even if he happens to reside in Northern California, it's okay to give him a try. There are worse things to support.

Mom and pop shops like Mollusk have to sell the surf dream to survive. I'm not sure what other kind of lifestyle a surfshop should pimp anyway, whether inland, local, or in a discotheque... figureskating?

Chum said...

Yeah Nash. I read that a while ago, but it's totally relevant still, although I have a hard time relating to the stuff that guy surfs in!

lawless said...

I personally think it's good to see the influx of art and music in today's surfing culture. It reminds me of the skate scene of the 80's just with more money and global exposure. Same concept though. Look at where the pro skaters of the 80s/90s are today. Natas Kaupas, Ray Barbee, Tommy Guerrero, Mark Gonzales. All were household names in the skate scene and moved on to make names for themselves in the art and music world. It's all naturally tied in together. You're already starting to see the same in todays surfers. Jack Johnson is a hell of alot better known for his music than for surfing Pipe.

The problem is board-wise, as a shaper you can't really compete with the cheap entry level China boards. You have to offer high quality hand finished boards to be able to make a living making surfboards. That's alot of the reason for the growth in the full resin-tint, pinlined boards. It's a higher pricepoint niche that hasn't been offshored to China... yet.

$1100 for a Hess board is sounder like a better and better deal every day.

Newyorksurf.com has some really tight interviews. I keep forgetting about that site, thanks for the link Nash.

Anonymous said...

Chum,

These guys are baiting you. (No pun intended.) Who cares what clothes someone wears to the beach? Why is this even an issue? Don't waste your breath, really. Save it for the paddle out.

Peace

Slim said...

yeah, had just read the Belik article earlier. Just another one in a long line of great characters that make up surfing's history.

ras said...

I never did look good in taps (tight ass pants) jeans. my belly was too big

Jeffery said...

Did I leave a comment here earlier?

Dude, don't take the bait. Anonymous is exactly right; it's a petty argument.